Dolls' Houses Past & Present

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Triang No. 50

Triang No. 50

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Triang No. 50
Original painted interior. The rough structure of the hardboard walls shows through the very thin cream paint.
Posted on April 25, 2015 Full Size|

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5 Comments

Edel
2:41 AM on April 27, 2015 
Julie Hardy says...
These "strengthening bits" are necessary in the early No 50s because the walls are only hardboard. Owing to post-WWII shortages, plywood wasn't available to be used in these houses until sometime after 1955. Houses produced from 1959 onwards all have plywood walls.

I think in this case, I would do as Rosemary did in her Butter House, and build up the floor, so that it's level. I would find it frustrating not to be able to put furniture flush to the wall! Nothing need be fixed permanently, just loose laid and slotted in.

That's interesting Julie about the unavailability of plywood until after 1955. I was pretty sure this house had to have been made fairly soon after the War because of the use of hardboard. Thank you also for the suggestion to lay loose floors upstairs. I am quite happy with my very minimalist solution of inserting strip of thick card under the carpet beneath the left-hand bed to deal with the problem of the batons in the bedroom, and in the bathroom the baton provides a mini platform for the sink and fire...
Brooksey
12:32 PM on April 26, 2015 
Rosemary says...
I HATE it when houses have those "strengthening" bits. They should be on all the corners of my 1961 Triang bungalow, but I omitted them on purpose which has made it a more fragile structure. In Butter House, a home made house of the 1920s, I built fake floors OVER the struts and it improved it greatly.


These "strengthening bits" are necessary in the early No 50s because the walls are only hardboard. Owing to post-WWII shortages, plywood wasn't available to be used in these houses until sometime after 1955. Houses produced from 1959 onwards all have plywood walls.

I think in this case, I would do as Rosemary did in her Butter House, and build up the floor, so that it's level. I would find it frustrating not to be able to put furniture flush to the wall! Nothing need be fixed permanently, just loose laid and slotted in.
Jan
8:34 AM on April 26, 2015 
Looks in good condition, I would put board against each lower outer wall to hold the upper floors in place.
Edel
12:12 PM on April 25, 2015 
Rosemary says...
I HATE it when houses have those "strengthening" bits. They should be on all the corners of my 1961 Triang bungalow, but I omitted them on purpose which has made it a more fragile structure. In Butter House, a home made house of the 1920s, I built fake floors OVER the struts and it improved it greatly.

I agree about the strengthening batons, but in this case I didn't want to interfere too much with a house in original condition. The hardboard floors/ceilings have warped a bit too, so it could be tricky fitting a new false floor neatly ;-)
Rosemary
11:11 AM on April 25, 2015 
I HATE it when houses have those "strengthening" bits. They should be on all the corners of my 1961 Triang bungalow, but I omitted them on purpose which has made it a more fragile structure. In Butter House, a home made house of the 1920s, I built fake floors OVER the struts and it improved it greatly.

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