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Cardboard tiling attempt

Growing a building to go round the tiles

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Growing a building to go round the tiles
The porch for the whole model/building/dolls' house ... is hopefully going to be a removable section. The 'front door' is a big part of it. The overdoor is a Sue Cook plaster moulding and the bit squaring it off is another piece of balsa bruising using a 1950s button and a metal doo-dah that gives a crossed swords sort of hint.
Posted on March 10, 2015 Full Size|

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5 Comments

theinfill.wordpress.com
10:18 AM on March 12, 2015 
Janice says...
Thanks very much for that, very helpful. This site is wonderful for picking other people's brains, I would never have thought of that on my own! I've never tried pastels before, but you seem to use them quite a lot so they must be worthwhile.
Your result this time certainly looks very rich and the plaster doesn't seem to have fallen to bits!

I cracked the one I used in the big sitting room right down the middle when putting it in! The pastels thing I picked up from various sites and mags - including articles written by Sue Cook who uses them in her scenes for finishing touches. I like working with anything I can mess about with my fingers - what a mess
Janice
9:07 AM on March 12, 2015 
theinfill.wordpress.com says...
I've coloured up at least 3 Sue Cook items and done something different each time. I think this time gave a fuller colour result. The first time I sealed it first and then used acrylic paints which for some reason looked a little 'dead'. Second time it was a mix of acrylics and pastels rubbed in which had a livelier look, but this time I used pastels rubbed in with a follow up of surgical spirit, tho I didn't seal it first. In all 3 cases the surface felt sticky for a day or so after colouring. I was worried this last time cos I didn't know what the spirit would do to the plaster.


Thanks very much for that, very helpful. This site is wonderful for picking other people's brains, I would never have thought of that on my own! I've never tried pastels before, but you seem to use them quite a lot so they must be worthwhile.
Your result this time certainly looks very rich and the plaster doesn't seem to have fallen to bits!
theinfill.wordpress.com
10:33 AM on March 11, 2015 
Janice says...
This is very effective. I had in mind to do something with a plaster moulding but wasn't sure how it would take colour as it is obviously very porous. What have you used on this?

I've coloured up at least 3 Sue Cook items and done something different each time. I think this time gave a fuller colour result. The first time I sealed it first and then used acrylic paints which for some reason looked a little 'dead'. Second time it was a mix of acrylics and pastels rubbed in which had a livelier look, but this time I used pastels rubbed in with a follow up of surgical spirit, tho I didn't seal it first. In all 3 cases the surface felt sticky for a day or so after colouring. I was worried this last time cos I didn't know what the spirit would do to the plaster.
Janice
7:32 AM on March 11, 2015 
This is very effective. I had in mind to do something with a plaster moulding but wasn't sure how it would take colour as it is obviously very porous. What have you used on this?
Zoe H
5:15 PM on March 10, 2015 
You've got that "balsa bruising" off to a fine art now, it's lovely.

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