Dolls' Houses Past & Present

A website and ezine about dolls' houses: antique, vintage and modern. Plus furniture and accessories.

Cardboard tiling attempt

After retouching work

« Back to Album Photo 5 of 16 Previous | Next
After retouching work
First lot were too startlingly bright so toned down some and recoloured others
Posted on March 7, 2015 Full Size|

Comments

Oops!

Oops, you forgot something.

Oops!

The words you entered did not match the given text. Please try again.

You must be a member to comment on this page. Sign In or Register

9 Comments

theinfill.wordpress.com
5:16 AM on May 1, 2015 
Jeanette says...
Wonderful work, very creative in every way possible and it looks amazing...

Many thanks ;)
Jeanette
12:39 PM on April 30, 2015 
Wonderful work, very creative in every way possible and it looks amazing...
theinfill.wordpress.com
3:56 PM on March 10, 2015 
Julie Hardy says...
I've seen floors like this, where tiles are mixed together, in real-life 16th and 17th century houses. Even a few good tiles were too precious to waste!

Just last Friday, we visited St Mary's church in Shrewsbury, parts of which date to the 12th century. Its ancient stained-glass windows had been destroyed by the Puritans, during the Commonwealth. They were restored in the 18th and 19th centuries, by re-using windows from local religious establishments which had been demolished or by buying them from churches in Continental Europe. Some side windows in St Mary's are composed almost entirely of random scraps - a disembodied face or other isolated detail can be seen inserted into the tracery, but the windows look very colourful and effective.

Wow - I'd love to see the windows
Brooksey
7:06 AM on March 10, 2015 
I've seen floors like this, where tiles are mixed together, in real-life 16th and 17th century houses. Even a few good tiles were too precious to waste!

Just last Friday, we visited St Mary's church in Shrewsbury, parts of which date to the 12th century. Its ancient stained-glass windows had been destroyed by the Puritans, during the Commonwealth. They were restored in the 18th and 19th centuries, by re-using windows from local religious establishments which had been demolished or by buying them from churches in Continental Europe. Some side windows in St Mary's are composed almost entirely of random scraps - a disembodied face or other isolated detail can be seen inserted into the tracery, but the windows look very colourful and effective.
Brooksey
6:56 AM on March 10, 2015 
Jan says...
You manage to get a lovely original used look to your work which I really like, when I have tried to age something it never looks original, just like I've messed it up.


Aw, Jan - that would be me, too, I think!
Jan
10:22 AM on March 8, 2015 
You manage to get a lovely original used look to your work which I really like, when I have tried to age something it never looks original, just like I've messed it up.
theinfill.wordpress.com
9:54 AM on March 8, 2015 
Zoe H says...
Exactly!

Ta chaps - you can't see here but I pinched an idea from Casey's Minis where she uses a crochet hook head run between the tiles to create a beveled edge. Mind you she's using movie food trays (thick version of egg box cardboard) and this card here is so thin it gave only a minimal bevel - sounds like some minor illness doesn't it?
Zoe H
7:18 AM on March 8, 2015 
jenny says...
Cardboard?!?! That looks fabulous!

Exactly!
jenny
5:51 AM on March 8, 2015 
Cardboard?!?! That looks fabulous!

Photo Categories