Dolls' Houses Past & Present

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"Deanhaven" - a 1960s UK holiday camp

Detail of heater

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Detail of heater
German, bought from Dale and Michelle. I "don't do" favourites but from my entire collection, this is one of the pieces I do especially love! I think it strikes exactly the right utilitarian note for this setting and I'm glad to think that there is a source of heat for the holidaymakers during a typical cold, wet English summer.
Posted on May 13, 2013 Full Size|

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16 Comments

Brooksey
7:59 PM on May 29, 2013 
Thank you very much, Jill.
jill
4:32 PM on May 29, 2013 
Julie, I am bowled over by your holiday camp and your meticulous attention to detail. I'm not surprised that you've already spent two years on this project - it's amazing. I love loads about it, especially your postcard rack and your various heaters. Stunning!
Brooksey
7:52 AM on May 29, 2013 
Could they have been Curity [Something] pads, Valerie? That name is lurking around the edges of my memory...
lallyp
6:38 PM on May 26, 2013 
Julie Hardy says...
Thank you for this very interesting contribution, Valerie! Historical accuracy is SO important for me. I actually knew that my original statement was too sweeping. I was aware that Paddi Pads were around in the mid-60s but how much detail do I go into with captions and comments? All my albums turn into a book - LOL! In fact, Paddi Pads were first marketed in 1950. I know, though, that they weren't universally popular - some mothers found them less effective than terry nappies and they were expensive. My own mother certainly didn't have a good word for them - she'd tried them with me and my sister in the mid to late 50s and had found that they clumped, then fell apart, when wet. I should imagine that the materials used had improved by the latter 60s, though, which would have made them more efficient. Whilst the camp will still offer a traditional nappy-washing service, I think that I'll have to put a packet or two of Paddi Pads into the shop!

Who would have thought that getting a dolls house would lead eventually to a detailed discussion on the social history of nappies!

I've done it again, haven't I, Julie? There was another manufacturer but I can't remember the name. The pads were sort of oval and quilted, so they didn't fall apart at all.
Brooksey
5:57 AM on May 26, 2013 
lallyp says...
Sorry, Julie, there were Paddi pads in 1965. Laura was born in June 1964 and was potty trained by the end of 1965, and I distinctly remember putting her to bed in a terry nappy with a Paddi pad inside and plastic pants. They were just a long oblong of cotton wool on top of some sort of absorbant paper and no waterproof cover as now. They could be used inside plastic pants that had a pocket each end to keep them in place, fine if you were going out for the day and didn't want smelly nappies around. I remember I used them on holiday in 1968 when Clare was a baby, and they worked!


Thank you for this very interesting contribution, Valerie! Historical accuracy is SO important for me. I actually knew that my original statement was too sweeping. I was aware that Paddi Pads were around in the mid-60s but how much detail do I go into with captions and comments? All my albums turn into a book - LOL! In fact, Paddi Pads were first marketed in 1950. I know, though, that they weren't universally popular - some mothers found them less effective than terry nappies and they were expensive. My own mother certainly didn't have a good word for them - she'd tried them with me and my sister in the mid to late 50s and had found that they clumped, then fell apart, when wet. I should imagine that the materials used had improved by the latter 60s, though, which would have made them more efficient. Whilst the camp will still offer a traditional nappy-washing service, I think that I'll have to put a packet or two of Paddi Pads into the shop!

Who would have thought that getting a dolls house would lead eventually to a detailed discussion on the social history of nappies!
lallyp
5:13 AM on May 26, 2013 
Julie Hardy says...
@ lallyp and Zoe H: LOL!

The self-catering camps did have launderettes in the early 1970s, but as I said earlier, I think this chalet is a bit anachronistic having a kitchen in 1965, so I've deliberately not gone down that route. I think rinsing undies through, in the bathroom, as Valerie describes, is what will happen here. My family never stayed in a holiday camp - our holiday accommodation in the early 1960s was a boarding house: bed, breakfast and evening meal and no en suite bathrooms in those days. Mum used to put anything which needed to dry on towels, either draped over the bed rails or lying flat on the windowsill.

In archive pictures of the smaller Warner's holiday camps from 1960, there are improvised clotheslines hanging up outside the chalets.

I think holiday camps might have had a nappy-washing service. I'll have to see if I can confirm that. There were certainly no effective disposable nappies in 1965 or earlier. Another tantalising question to which I shall have to find an answer!

Sorry, Julie, there were Paddi pads in 1965. Laura was born in June 1964 and was potty trained by the end of 1965, and I distinctly remember putting her to bed in a terry nappy with a Paddi pad inside and plastic pants. They were just a long oblong of cotton wool on top of some sort of absorbant paper and no waterproof cover as now. They could be used inside plastic pants that had a pocket each end to keep them in place, fine if you were going out for the day and didn't want smelly nappies around. I remember I used them on holiday in 1968 when Clare was a baby, and they worked!
Brooksey
8:07 PM on May 13, 2013 
Julie Hardy says...
I think holiday camps might have had a nappy-washing service. I'll have to see if I can confirm that. There were certainly no effective disposable nappies in 1965 or earlier. Another tantalising question to which I shall have to find an answer!


Warner's 1960 brochure states that there is a nappy-washing service!
Brooksey
7:07 PM on May 13, 2013 
Zoe H says...
I just noticed there is a towel rail in the bathroom. I think people would have put this in front of the fab heater (one available from Kitty Mac at the moment I see) in the living room. There were probably fires and injuries as a result (this almost happened when my housemate at uni did he same thing!)


Yes, you're right - that would happen, especially in wet weather. It has to be remembered, too, that a lot of people didn't actually change their clothes very often in those days, not even their underwear. Travelling on buses in the summer could be very unpleasant!

(Dale and Michelle trade as Kitty Mac. I bought this heater from them about 2 years ago).
Brooksey
7:01 PM on May 13, 2013 
@ lallyp and Zoe H: LOL!

The self-catering camps did have launderettes in the early 1970s, but as I said earlier, I think this chalet is a bit anachronistic having a kitchen in 1965, so I've deliberately not gone down that route. I think rinsing undies through, in the bathroom, as Valerie describes, is what will happen here. My family never stayed in a holiday camp - our holiday accommodation in the early 1960s was a boarding house: bed, breakfast and evening meal and no en suite bathrooms in those days. Mum used to put anything which needed to dry on towels, either draped over the bed rails or lying flat on the windowsill.

In archive pictures of the smaller Warner's holiday camps from 1960, there are improvised clotheslines hanging up outside the chalets.

I think holiday camps might have had a nappy-washing service. I'll have to see if I can confirm that. There were certainly no effective disposable nappies in 1965 or earlier. Another tantalising question to which I shall have to find an answer!
Zoe H
6:43 PM on May 13, 2013 
I just noticed there is a towel rail in the bathroom. I think people would have put this in front of the fab heater (one available from Kitty Mac at the moment I see) in the living room. There were probably fires and injuries as a result (this almost happened when my housemate at uni did he same thing!)
lallyp
5:57 PM on May 13, 2013 
Zoe H says...
What about one of those collapsable clothes airers? I think the drying clothes thing would have been an issue or did they usually have a launderette in the camp? (Oh no this could be a can of worms opening! Blame Valerie not me!!)

Thank you, Zoe! Now I am in the ****!
Seriously, we had very few clothes, unless we made our own, as I did, so washing them while on holiday would have been necessary. We used to rinse out our stockings and underwear before bed, roll them in a towel to remove most of the water and hang them over the bath overnight. I have no idea what families with babies in nappies did in a camp!
When ours were young we used to rent a flat or a house and so we could hang the washing on the line outside.
Zoe H
2:09 PM on May 13, 2013 
What about one of those collapsable clothes airers? I think the drying clothes thing would have been an issue or did they usually have a launderette in the camp? (Oh no this could be a can of worms opening! Blame Valerie not me!!)
lallyp
1:44 PM on May 13, 2013 
Julie Hardy says...
I've been to have another look through the archived Pontin's brochure that's on the butlins memories website, where I've done most of my research for this project. In the bathrooms which are pictured, there's no evidence of any drying lines, so I think I shall be leaving out that detail...LOL!.

Julie, I never went to a Holiday camp, we had one in the bathroom at Mum's but whether that was 1965 or later, I can't remember!
Brooksey
11:25 AM on May 13, 2013 
I've been to have another look through the archived Pontin's brochure that's on the butlins memories website, where I've done most of my research for this project. In the bathrooms which are pictured, there's no evidence of any drying lines, so I think I shall be leaving out that detail...LOL!.
Brooksey
11:17 AM on May 13, 2013 
"Tidy Dry". Were they as early as 1965? Might be a bit difficult to create in 1:16. (There aren't two anchoring points over this bath anyway!).
lallyp
11:00 AM on May 13, 2013 
Have they got one of those pull out lines over the bath? We had one. If you were very unlucky and the weather was wet you had a bath with nylons dripping on you!

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