Dolls' Houses Past & Present

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Washing Boiler

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Washing Boiler
Spent the whole day making this out of a kitchen roll insert, just got to refine the lid and add a chimney flue.
Posted on February 17, 2013 Full Size|

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22 Comments

Comfort
10:04 AM on March 21, 2014 
excellent! thanks for telling your secret!
Joan Mc
5:34 AM on March 21, 2014 
Comfort says...
lol at so many of the comments! i love it when y'all give memories like this...and so much educational information! i Love this site! Joan, this is great! you are so handy! i love the fire! it looks real. how did you get it to glow? did you paint the foil? with red or orange?

Hi Comfort, thanks for your comments. I used sweetie papers from a box of chocolates for the glow in the fire.
Comfort
10:50 AM on March 20, 2014 
lol at so many of the comments! i love it when y'all give memories like this...and so much educational information! i Love this site! Joan, this is great! you are so handy! i love the fire! it looks real. how did you get it to glow? did you paint the foil? with red or orange?
Brooksey
7:50 AM on February 21, 2013 
lallyp says...
They boiled hams in them too, Julie!


...and legs of mutton! They were certainly useful!
lallyp
7:03 AM on February 21, 2013 
Joan Mc says...
I tried to find your Stockbroker, I'm just learning how to find my way around the photographs section, not much success so far

I think it is under Valerie's New Houses but I can't remember! It was originally Rowanberry's Stockbroker, I bought it from her!
lallyp
6:59 AM on February 21, 2013 
Julie Hardy says...
This is excellent, Joan! Kitchen roll inserts are big enough to do this with, these days. An example of "invisible" inflation, the centres of kitchen rolls and toilet rolls have been getting bigger and bigger, so that the rolls stay the same diameter but with fewer sheets in them. The other day, I finished a kitchen roll that had been in one of my tool boxes for about 5 years - its centre was half the width of the one currently in the kitchen!

Another use for the copper was for boiling Christmas puddings - that's why they used to be round, like a ball. They were shaped, wrapped in pudding-cloths and boiled in the copper. They stayed round because the water was deep and boiling merrily, so the puddings never touched the bottom of the copper's bowl. Once coppers became less common, puddings had to be made in basins, as pans weren't deep enough to allow round puddings to keep their shape.

They boiled hams in them too, Julie!
ilenalana
3:15 AM on February 21, 2013 
I just remembered I took one of these out of the tudor house when I was stripping it and also Steve bought me one that lights up. Don't know where I've put them though, I'll be on a mission now looking for them. My memory is absolutely awful, it must be my age.
Wendy Stephen
1:26 PM on February 19, 2013 
This is excellent :-)
Brooksey
11:57 AM on February 19, 2013 
This is excellent, Joan! Kitchen roll inserts are big enough to do this with, these days. An example of "invisible" inflation, the centres of kitchen rolls and toilet rolls have been getting bigger and bigger, so that the rolls stay the same diameter but with fewer sheets in them. The other day, I finished a kitchen roll that had been in one of my tool boxes for about 5 years - its centre was half the width of the one currently in the kitchen!

Another use for the copper was for boiling Christmas puddings - that's why they used to be round, like a ball. They were shaped, wrapped in pudding-cloths and boiled in the copper. They stayed round because the water was deep and boiling merrily, so the puddings never touched the bottom of the copper's bowl. Once coppers became less common, puddings had to be made in basins, as pans weren't deep enough to allow round puddings to keep their shape.
Joan Mc
3:40 AM on February 19, 2013 
lallyp says...
This looks great! The house I grew up in was built in 1881 and although the copper wasn't visible, when the floor rotted ,the base was still in situ. That was round too! They didn't have a grill as I remember, my aunt had a copper in her scullery and there was no grill across the fire. She still used hers and the mangle! You can make good tongs from two shaped pieces of Balsa and a strip of tin foil to join them at the top. See my Stockbroker.

I tried to find your Stockbroker, I'm just learning how to find my way around the photographs section, not much success so far
Joan Mc
3:37 AM on February 19, 2013 
Adele Wallace says...
sorry but reply wouldnt post and now it has done it in triple lol


Hi Adele, thanks for your comments (deleted the extra ones) :)
Rosemary
3:36 AM on February 19, 2013 
Phoenix miniatures do a mangle kit - it isn't cheap but looks very good when made up. My husband made mine and it's in my no.15 in the scullery (Triang/Lines albums) I think that this kit one is the best that I have seen - I always take a good look at any mangles that come up on eBay.
Adele Wallace
7:41 AM on February 18, 2013 
sorry but reply wouldnt post and now it has done it in triple lol
Adele Wallace
7:34 AM on February 18, 2013 
thats brilliant Joan you are very clever and having read all the replies to our pic i have now learnt a little bit more history as i had never seen or heard of one of these before .
lallyp
7:09 AM on February 18, 2013 
This looks great! The house I grew up in was built in 1881 and although the copper wasn't visible, when the floor rotted ,the base was still in situ. That was round too! They didn't have a grill as I remember, my aunt had a copper in her scullery and there was no grill across the fire. She still used hers and the mangle! You can make good tongs from two shaped pieces of Balsa and a strip of tin foil to join them at the top. See my Stockbroker.
Rebecca Green
5:03 AM on February 18, 2013 
It looks great! And although I haven't used one myself, I have lived in houses which still had the copper in the laundry (and the old stone laundry basins) - they were certainly common well into the 1940s and probably later.
Joan Mc
4:14 AM on February 18, 2013 
Hi Christine, I remember my aunt's outside washing house which had 'coppers', belfast sinks, wringers (mangles) and was shared with another 5 cottages. Each family had their own designated washing day. I've been trying to buy a dolls house mangle online too. How fortunate you are to have the real thing.
christine jaeger
3:46 AM on February 18, 2013 
ps. i have (in real size) 2 old mangles (wringers) that were used in conjuction with these coppers.. usually outside, here.. i keep bidding on d/h size ones but they seem to go out of my price range.. :)
christine jaeger
3:40 AM on February 18, 2013 
in australia we called them coppers.. i think because the bowl that the water was heated in was made from copper.. i must be old, my nanna had one and i have used one.. if you are lucky to have one these days, they are great for cooking crabs and lobsters in..
Joan Mc
3:00 AM on February 18, 2013 
I need to fit some sort of guard at the bottom

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