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Zoe H
Administrator
Posts: 1728

I see that the baby house from The Miniaturist has gone onto eBay. I’d be very tempted if I was anywhere near London.


https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/17th-Century-Style-Handcrafted-Dollshouse-featured-in-BBC-drama-The-Miniaturist/153032091201?hash=item23a16c6641:g:1jYAAOSwX3FbA-mJ

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Zoe

https://trulymadlytiny.blogspot.co.uk

http://grecondale.com

May 23, 2018 at 4:19 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Trumble's Mum
Member
Posts: 587

Zoe H at May 23, 2018 at 4:19 AM

I see that the baby house from The Miniaturist has gone onto eBay. I’d be very tempted if I was anywhere near London.


https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/17th-Century-Style-Handcrafted-Dollshouse-featured-in-BBC-drama-The-Miniaturist/153032091201?hash=item23a16c6641:g:1jYAAOSwX3FbA-mJ

Wow! I didn't expect that to go up for sale yet - if ever.


I'm not tempted as the size and price would be a problem and, lovely though it would look if we still lived in a huge old house instead of a peasant's cottage, it wouldn't be shown off to best advantage here. But it is wonderful to be able to enlarge the photo and see the style of the interior without furniture.

Thanks for sharing the link, Zoe!

  Jenni

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May 23, 2018 at 4:41 AM Flag Quote & Reply

cestina
Member
Posts: 473

Oh good, a house I have no desire to own! :)

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Cestina's Dollshouses: https://czechdollshouses.blogspot.com/2019/04/in-eclectic-manor_20.html" target="_blank">In an Eclectic Manor

May 23, 2018 at 7:29 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Jane
Member
Posts: 893

Buy now for 650 pounds up top and says price is 5000 pounds inc. VAT or best offer at the bottom. !!! I like it but I wouldn't want to buy it without seeing it in the flesh -- quite a few props look much better on camera than they do when you see them in real life :)


May 23, 2018 at 8:05 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Holly
Member
Posts: 168

An interesting thing to have for someone although I am guessing it is made from mdf one of my pet hates. Or maybe birch ply but still won't have the charm of a genuine old house so not sure it would be the same for me.


Think I will stick with my authentic wrecks! Much more fun ;)


The house would suit someone with a passion for modern day high end artisan figures I think which arent really my cup of tea either. I am very surprised it didn't sell at KDF.

May 23, 2018 at 8:43 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Brooksey
Administrator
Posts: 1716

Oh, yes - I was supposed to have reported on seeing this at KDF, wasn't I! I didn't photograph it in the end, because it was displayed empty - none of the dolls, furniture or accessories were with it. The interiors of the rooms were hardly visible - large photos of scenes from the programmes dominated every one, and obscured all the detail, so taking pictures seemed pointless.


The asking price at the Festival was £5000.00 + VAT. To see it offered on eBay at 1/10 of that is surprising.

May 23, 2018 at 12:36 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Holly
Member
Posts: 168

Yes the price is surprising. Either an error or they just want it out of the way now asap. I suppose it could have been made from pine parts of it are very thick, does anyone know what it is made from?


When the miniaturist was released I thought Mulvaney and Rogers made it but not sure now.

It would have been interesting to see it close up I can't gauge the quality of the scumbled finish at all from the photos, I suspect like Jane says it looks a bit more crude in real life without all the miniatures.

Did the miniatures sell at KDF anyone know what happened to them?


May 23, 2018 at 12:47 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Brooksey
Administrator
Posts: 1716

Mulvaney and Rogers didn't make the cabinet. It was built by/on behalf of The Forge, the independent production company who made the drama. The finish of it looked very good under the lights at KDF, but I don't know what materials were used in its construction.


The Forge approached Mulvaney and Rogers in order to find miniaturists who could make the furnishings, dolls, food and all the other accessories. None of these miniatures were offered for sale at Kensington - they weren't even on display, which was very disappointing.

May 23, 2018 at 4:06 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Edel
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Posts: 482

cestina at May 23, 2018 at 7:29 AM

Oh good, a house I have no desire to own! :)

LOL!!! :)

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Edel

https://www.flickr.com/photos/shero6820/

May 24, 2018 at 2:08 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Zoe H
Administrator
Posts: 1728

Brooksey at May 23, 2018 at 4:06 PM

Mulvaney and Rogers didn't make the cabinet. It was built by/on behalf of The Forge, the independent production company who made the drama. The finish of it looked very good under the lights at KDF, but I don't know what materials were used in its construction.


The Forge approached Mulvaney and Rogers in order to find miniaturists who could make the furnishings, dolls, food and all the other accessories. None of these miniatures were offered for sale at Kensington - they weren't even on display, which was very disappointing.

I saw on a Facebook page a while back that someone had bought some of the furniture from Kristin Baybars’ shop. I believe it had been loaned for the production and then sold as having been used in it (or more likely heaped in a corner and purchased when KB casually mentioned it had been used in the production! Lol)

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Zoe

https://trulymadlytiny.blogspot.co.uk

http://grecondale.com

May 24, 2018 at 3:49 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Holly
Member
Posts: 168

I am so surprised it is still available today, dreadful for us who all have the 'give a dolls house a home' gene. I mustn't buy, I mustn't buy...


It is very big and I am 'dolls housed' up to the eaves, even if a third of the size of the original! Shame that the miniatures blurred into oblivion a lovely provenance they had to keep future dolls house enthusiasts interested.


It wouldn't be too hard to get it populated again and looking very period.

It would be a really fun project for someone to recreate 'The Miniaturist' miniatures in it.

May 24, 2018 at 6:50 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Rosemary
Member
Posts: 2505

I suspect the bill for this would be rather higher than that of Amsterdam in the past - although the ladies did spend a fortune on their hobby - so nothing changes.....

May 24, 2018 at 1:39 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Holly
Member
Posts: 168

Phew.....just got back from a lovely day out visiting the Bronte parsonage and looks like someone bought it :)


Very relieved the temptation has gone really didn't want it but also couldn't bear to think of no-one else wanting it, if that makes sense!!


I am sure it will have gone to an appreciative home. Anyone here I wonder??

It would be interesting to know what happens to it in the future

May 24, 2018 at 2:41 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Trumble's Mum
Member
Posts: 587

cestina at May 23, 2018 at 7:29 AM

Oh good, a house I have no desire to own! :)

It is of its (pretend) time! Not really my cup of tea either, though I do see it as appealing as a museum piece.

Personally, I love the social history of the so called common man. Kings, princes lords and ladies of the past and all those boring laws were of no interes to me in history classes. All I wanted to know was about the domestic life of ordinary people and, though my little residents are far from ordinary in personality (Can't keep a good Grecon down - or even one with  missing foot and unravelling stockings!), they live ordinary lives in small houses. no grandeur allowed in Mayhem Village!

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May 25, 2018 at 2:12 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Jeanette
Member
Posts: 71
I totally agree with your slant on social history, Jenny,I like my wee folk to be down to earth Glaswegians. I love looking up that certain time and thanks to the internet I can find news stories immediately instead of booking time on the microfiche as you had to do years ago...Headlines, adverts and everyday life, great innit....
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May 25, 2018 at 3:22 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Trumble's Mum
Member
Posts: 587

Jeanette at May 25, 2018 at 3:22 AM

I totally agree with your slant on social history, Jenny,I like my wee folk to be down to earth Glaswegians. I love looking up that certain time and thanks to the internet I can find news stories immediately instead of booking time on the microfiche as you had to do years ago...Headlines, adverts and everyday life, great innit....

Oh NO, Jeanette.... now you've got me started again.....I suddenly fancy a wee Gaswegian tenement home with a Scots couple and their children to house there.... or maybe a whole tenement block with lots of friendly neighbours to dwell in it....

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May 25, 2018 at 7:27 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Holly
Member
Posts: 168

I know what you mean some of the very fine baby houses are quite clinical. Just too perfect. My favourite of the type is the 'Mon Plaisir' arrangement with all the true to life scenes of people up to everyday activities and even some rather naughty scenes!


When I was at school I was forced to study the 2 world wars and hated everything related to wartime. Now I am older I think about my grandparents living through that period with all its struggles and find a wartime dolls house very appealing. Not done one yet still trying to get the Victorian era out of my system! Your little tenement block sounds like a lovely idea. At Newbury I particularly like the little Miner's cottage made out of an old 2 room Lines house.




May 25, 2018 at 8:31 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Trumble's Mum
Member
Posts: 587
I am planning a WW2 home too, Holly. But I am thinking of making the residents of WW2 time who live in an earlier period house. I don't think any of our friends or relatives lived in brand new houses in the late 30s and 40s, most lived in Victorian houses or even earlier ones. Can't wait to start, but we haven't the space at the moment.
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May 25, 2018 at 11:09 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Holly
Member
Posts: 168

Yes, you are very right. I have been toying with the idea of trying to make a 1940's interior work in a half Kits Coty I would really like to do a little vicarage 'Father Brown' ish! Still considering...


 I have been contemplating a house for the 40s or 30s. I don't think it would be any good in my box backs but a I think a half Kits is quite 'suburban' not necessarily for a vicar but for a 40's interior.


It sounds wrong but when you think about it a lot of houses in the V&A were even Georgian ones that were 'done up' in the Victorian era or a substantial time 50 years or so after they were made. I think like a real home it is nice sometimes when a house has had changes made to it by previous owners all reflecting it's history.


As you say in the 1940s people often lived in much older style houses it doesn't just have to be an 'ultra modern' to be deco. Country Vicar in the Georgian Rectory. I am sure a lot of people will think 'ugh' but there really should be no rules and dolls houses can reflect real life.


One of my favourite National Trust interiors is 'Mr Straws House'

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/mr-straws-house

An edwardian terrace that had been almost untouched since the 1920's where 2 eccentric brothers lived and left most things untouched after their parents died.


It has lovely touches like the interior is so generally Victorian/Edwardian but the mother has at some point tried to be more 'up-to-date' and made some lovely 1930's style curtains and cushions in one of the room and it has all been left just as it was handed over to the trust.


Back to the original topic the Miniaturist house. That is one thing that put me off it as I do think it would only work with the exact period miniatures not much room for diversification so too rigid a project for me.

May 25, 2018 at 2:38 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Trumble's Mum
Member
Posts: 587
I honestly believe that, until the late 70s when many began throwing out the furniture and buying new every time they redecorate a room in order to c having coordinating, part of the charm of British homes was the mix of furniture and soft furnishings in them. People valued Germany's China cabinet, the cushion Auntie May' embroidered and Great Grandpa"s painting of some forgotten, long ago battle because of the memories they have of the person who gave them. Those homes that have inherited items or vintage buys mixed with newer stuff are always more interesting to me than a house filled with uniform, matching things. Just as well that my d/h people agree! My only rule is that, if a house is set in a period, it can't contain anything that is from a later one. But if my residents choose to keep a 10th century cauldron that they managed to unearth while digging the potatoes up for their 1956 Christmas dinner or become sentimental over a biscuit tin they have been using for 50 years, that is entirely up to them, hee hee!
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May 25, 2018 at 3:03 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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