Dolls' Houses Past & Present

A website and ezine about dolls' houses: antique, vintage and modern. Plus furniture and accessories.

Ann Meehan Collection: One of the most exciting days in our dollhouse lives!                                   by Carol  Morehead and Susan Hale

One of the most exciting days of our dollhouse lives happened on a recent trip we took together. American collector Ann Meehan graciously gave us a tour of her magnificent collection of antique dollhouses.

Carol starts: The first dollhouse was an antique Spanish dollhouse with quite a provenance. I love the grilled windows and quoins (stone borders up the sides). Notice the widow's walk with glass cupola.

Photo by Carol Morehead

 

This is the conference room. The dishes on the table are Treen ware. (Don't even get Susan started about Treen ware!)

Photo by Carol Morehead

 

After our visit, Ann surprised us by sending even more pictures of this house! Look at that epergne of fruit!

Photo by Ann Meehan
 

This is the bedroom. Look at the leather suitcase, the rug, the clock, the chandelier! What did he say or not say to her? Is she staying or leaving? Look at the expression on her face...

 

Photo by Ann Meehan
 

This doll house has a Chapel. Where to start here? The carved organ, the Fathers, Mother Superior as Ann calls the nun to your left. Look at the kneeler, the chalices! The pictures.

Photo by Ann Meehan 

 

Ann calls this "A few soldiers in the conference room." Look at the detail!
Am I fawning or drooling? (Both!)

Photo by Ann Meehan
 

 

The next house was this amazing FAO Schwarz Mystery House! 

 

Photo by Carol Morehead

 

This is what the house looks like with the main facade removed.

 

Photo by Carol Morehead

 

The detailing in the floors is amazing.

Photo by Carol Morehead


The wallpaper is original. The blues are so soothing and harmonious. The dishes are Treen, this is a visual feast! Look at the chandelier!

 

Photo by Ann Meehan

 

The kitchen is in the side annexe.

 

Photo by Carol Morehead

 Look at this kitchen! The white metal set is German Bing. I have never seen such a complete set. More treen ware on the counter, baskets of eggs on the floor, and the canister set on the back wall, with the cup holders! It is such a complete kitchen. Once again be sure to notice the wallpaper and flooring. 

 

Photo by Ann Meehan 

 

Susan continues: Peek through the window of this wonderful house ...

 

Photo by Susan Hale
 

And you will see a lovely young lady at her toilette.

 

Photo by Susan Hale
 

Most of these houses are larger than 1:12 scale. The dolls are approximately 10"-12" high and the furniture is the perfect scale for them.

 

A sewing room:

 

Photo by Carol Morehead

 

As a sewer I am fascinated by the tiny sewing accessories in Ann's collection. It is all so tiny and perfect.
 
 Photo by Ann Meehan
 
 

 

Photo by Ann Meehan 

 

There is also a tiny stationery set:

 Photo by Carol Morehead

Carol adds: Look at the tiny papers and envelopes, and the little ink pot!

Imagine the artisans who put them together!

Susan goes on: As Carol mentioned, I fell in love with Treenware. Treenware is the old name for small handcrafted wooden items. The colorful dishes in the dresser are Treen.

 

Photo by Susan Hale

 

 

I also fell in love with this magnificent house. Ann is in the process of putting the final touches on its interior. 

Photo by Susan Hale

 Unlike many houses in Ann's collection this one has an open back. Most have doors on the front or side and open that way.

 

I was intrigued by the very lifelike billiard table. I put my hand in the picture for scale.

 

Photo by Susan Hale

 Don't you just love the linoleum?

 

Carol says: I added this doll because I want to see her whenever I feel like it!

 

Photo by Carol Morehead

Susan concludes: Carol and I were two lucky collectors that day. And we are very grateful for it. It all seems like a dream now. Ann is so kind, generous and fun, and a delight to spend the day with. Her collection is the ultimate for a collector of antique miniatures. She has been collecting a long time and seeing her wonderful items made me realize I am only in the infancy of my own collection. So many treasures, so little money, lol!

Thank you Ann Meehan for your gracious sharing of your collection.

 

Finally, Carol explains about Ann's website:

http://www.meehanantiqueminiatures.com/index.htm is Ann's website where she sells the most wonderful things. Please do not go there and buy anything because Susan and I want it all. Lol!

On Ann's website she has a newsletter called "All things Great and Small". She explains the history of each house and gives detailed information you cannot find anywhere else. There are many volumes and all her houses are covered. http://www.meehanantiqueminiatures.com/newsletterindex.htm has the past issues.

At http://www.meehanantiqueminiatures.com/annbio.htm you will see her curriculum vitae of 38 years work.

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